Home - Museums - Themes - Exhibitions - News - Contribute - Search -

Themes

Index

Lifesaving

Introduction

 

 

In the early 19th century most cargo was transported by sea rather than land. Sailing ships were completely at the mercy of the elements; despite skilled seamanship they could be calmed for days or battered to pieces on rocks and sandbanks.

Those who serve as lifeboatmen often come from families with a history of lifeboat service. Lifeboatmen often turn out in treacherous conditions to rescue complete strangers, not knowing if they will return to their own loved ones. Undaunted they attend rescue attempts time after time. The RNLI today is entirely funded by voluntary contributions, many motivated by the gratitude and relief of those who have been assisted. Lifeboat sheds around the East Coast and elsewhere in the country feature honour boards detailing the history of rescues undertaken, the number of lives saved and the names of lifeboatmen who made the ultimate sacrifice. Lifeboatmen themselves were often more silent and did not talk about the incidents, even when the outcome had been successful. Generally regarded as heroes, they did not view themselves in this way. Coxswain Henry Blogg of Cromer typified this approach and was famously modest and a man of few words.

 

The North Sea is not a pleasant place. The East Coast has always been one of the most dangerous for shipping in the whole of the British Isles, due to a large number of treacherous, shifting sandbanks, constantly moved by currents, tides and furious storms. Fishermen, merchant seamen and passengers risked their lives in storms and shoal water. Historically people of the East Coast have responded to the physical challenges of the sea. Many have cooperated to prevent disaster occurring to their fellow men, risking their lives serving in lifeboats and through other humanitarian efforts, displaying ingenuity and courage.  Many people were motivated to assist, having witnessed disasters for themselves. Beachmen along the East Coast were among the first to engage in rescuing vessels in distress. But a coordinated response was needed. Eventually county services were merged with the founding of the RNLI in the 1850s.

Related Pages

black and white photograph of Cromer coxswain Henry Blogg with the Prince of Wales at a presentation ceremony in the Central Hall, Westminster, London

Henry Blogg

black and white photograph of Cromer coxswain Henry Blogg with the Prince of Wales at a presentation ceremony in the Central Hall, Westminster, London

West Runton Elephant. A reconstruction drawing by Sam Brown of the likely appearance of the West Runton elephant.

colour slide

West Runton Elephant. A reconstruction drawing by Sam Brown of the likely appearance of the West Runton elephant.

Gansey knitting stick or shield

Knitting Stick

Gansey knitting stick or shield

Gansey

Propagansey, Cromer Museum 2pm Sat May 18th

Cromer Museum have kindly invited me to come & do my Propagansey talk & display this Satu…

photograph, colour slide, photographer Dr A.J. Stuart, 1990. Harold Hems measuring the pelvis of a large bull elephant in situ in the West Runton Freshwater Bed. 1990

Harold Hems measuring the WRE Pelvis

photograph, colour slide, photographer Dr A.J. Stuart, 1990. Harold Hems measuring the pelvis of a large bull elephant in situ in the West Runton Freshwater Bed. 1990

The Davies family taken between 1907 and 1909

The Davies family taken between 1907 and 1909

The Davies family taken between 1907 and 1909

Reminiscence of the Battle of the Dogger Bank

The Battle of the Dogger Bank

In March 1915 Rev Hamilton wrote in the Cromer Parish Magazine that he had been talking to Tom Ba…

A black and white photograph of Cromer coxswain Henry Blogg with the Prince of Wales at a presentation ceremony in the Central Hall, Westminster, London

Henry Blogg and the Prince of Wales

A black and white photograph of Cromer coxswain Henry Blogg with the Prince of Wales at a presentation ceremony in the Central Hall, Westminster, London

Six steel double-pointed needles, of size 16 and 17 gauge, the type used for knitting ganseys.

Gansey Doube-pointed Steel Knitting Needles

Six steel double-pointed needles, of size 16 and 17 gauge, the type used for knitting ganseys.

photograph, colour slide, photographer Dr A.J. Stuart, 1992. Artist Sam Brown worked with Tony Stuart to envisage what the West Runton elephant looked like - this is one of his sketches. 1992

West Runton Elephant

photograph, colour slide, photographer Dr A.J. Stuart, 1992. Artist Sam Brown worked with Tony Stuart to envisage what the West Runton elephant looked like - this is one of his sketches. 1992

Page from an Online Exhibition or Theme

Henry Blogg. His life and times in photos - part 1.

This page is part of the Narrative Theme(s): Lifesaving

This page is part of the Online Exhibition(s): Henry Blogg

Page from an Online Exhibition or Theme

Henry Blogg. His life and times in photos - part 2.

This page is part of the Narrative Theme(s): Lifesaving

This page is part of the Online Exhibition(s): Henry Blogg

Page from an Online Exhibition or Theme

Manby's Mortar

This page is part of the Narrative Theme(s): Lifesaving

This page is part of the Online Exhibition(s): The Maritime Collections of King's Lynn Museums

Page from an Online Exhibition or Theme

Lifesaving and Rescue in Mundesley

This page is part of the Narrative Theme(s): Lifesaving

This page is part of the Online Exhibition(s): Some Museum Exhibits

Page from an Online Exhibition or Theme

Sheringham's private lifeboats

This page is part of the Narrative Theme(s): Lifesaving

This page is part of the Online Exhibition(s): SAVING LIVES - SHERINGHAM'S PRIVATE LIFEBOATS

Page from an Online Exhibition or Theme

Lost at Sea off Sheringham

This page is part of the Narrative Theme(s): Lifesaving

This page is part of the Online Exhibition(s): SAVING LIVES - SHERINGHAM'S PRIVATE LIFEBOATS

Page from an Online Exhibition or Theme

Captain George Manby

This page is part of the Narrative Theme(s): Lifesaving

This page is part of the Online Exhibition(s): Captain George Manby

Page from an Online Exhibition or Theme

James Stevens No.14 Lifeboat

This page is part of the Narrative Theme(s): Lifesaving

This page is part of the Online Exhibition(s): James Stevens No.14 Lifeboat

Page from an Online Exhibition or Theme

Stone Plaque from Manby Monument

This page is part of the Narrative Theme(s): Lifesaving

This page is part of the Online Exhibition(s): Captain George Manby

Page from an Online Exhibition or Theme

Manby Model- Breeches Buoy

This page is part of the Narrative Theme(s): Lifesaving

This page is part of the Online Exhibition(s): Captain George Manby