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Fishing

Introduction

Fishing for herring dominated the fishing along the East Coast, especially at Great Yarmouth and Lowestoft. But this is not the whole story. Following the coast from the Wash round to Essex, there were a number of different fishing operations, all set up to gain a living from the sea. In the late 18th and early 19th centuries, whaling operated from King's Lynn, and along the north west and north norfolk coasts there was a thriving shell fishery, for mussels, cockles and whelks. At Cromer, crab fishing and longshore fishing dominated. Inland, on the Broads, freshwater catches such as eels were exploited. In Essex, at Mersea, Burnham on Crouch and Brightlingsea, whitebait and oyster fishing were of more significance.

Comments

Posted:2016 3 24 14:32:30 GMT
Gansey Patterns as an aid to identification.
More of a question really. Am I right in thinking that the wives who made the ganseys incorporated patterns into them in a unique way which they could recognise if their men were drowned at sea? I ask as a descendant of a fisherman lost in the storm of November 1807..
V. Hannah North Wales
Posted:2016 8 3 14:55:26 GMT
Gansey Patterns as an aid to identification
Hi! Yes that's my understanding. Each family would slightly adapt the individual village's pattern to make their own men easily identifiable. Sad, but very practical!
Robyn Roberts Northumberland

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Fishing

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Sheringham Fishermen's Ganseys

Like other fishing communities throughout maritime Britain, Sheringham fishermen wore ganseys, durable knitted sweaters/jumpers with distinctive patterns.  Here are some examples of the patterns they used, and some images of the fishermen who wore them during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

The gansey was standard workwear for fishermen, tight fitting and protection against damp and cold. The first photo on this page shows a well worn garment.  Usually a fisherman would also have had one for "Sunday best". The photo to the left below shows a Sheringham fisherman wearing his best gansey under a smart jacket with a velvet collar.  The design is very fine.

Also shown here is a gansey knitted using modern materials. The oiled wool which was used by fishermen's wives can no longer be purchased.  This garment was produced using a knitting machine rather than hand knitted 'in the round' in the traditional way.

Comments

Posted:2016 3 24 14:32:30 GMT
Gansey Patterns as an aid to identification.
More of a question really. Am I right in thinking that the wives who made the ganseys incorporated patterns into them in a unique way which they could recognise if their men were drowned at sea? I ask as a descendant of a fisherman lost in the storm of November 1807..
V. Hannah North Wales
Posted:2016 8 3 14:55:26 GMT
Gansey Patterns as an aid to identification
Hi! Yes that's my understanding. Each family would slightly adapt the individual village's pattern to make their own men easily identifiable. Sad, but very practical!
Robyn Roberts Northumberland

Add a Comment

In order to defeat spam we require javascript to be enabled in your browser before you can comment on this site.

Previous Page 4 of 7 next

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The Augusta was Sheringham's first purpose built lifeboat, in service from 1838 until 1894.

The Augusta lifeboat

The Augusta was Sheringham's first purpose built lifeboat, in service from 1838 until 1894.

The Upcher fishing boat was built in 1826 with money loaned by Charlotte Upcher of Sheringham Hall.  Being the largest fishing boat available, it was also used for rescues until a purpose built lifeboat took its place.

Upcher Fishing and Rescue Boat

The Upcher fishing boat was built in 1826 with money loaned by Charlotte Upcher of Sheringham Hall. Being the largest fishing boat available, it was also used for rescues until a purpose built lifeboat took its place.

A gansey knitted using a traditional pattern with modern materials

Modern version of a gansey

A gansey knitted using a traditional pattern with modern materials

Sheringham gansey worn by a Sheringham fisherman

Sunday-best gansey

Sheringham gansey worn by a Sheringham fisherman

Shell Art

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