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Fishing

Introduction

Fishing for herring dominated the fishing along the East Coast, especially at Great Yarmouth and Lowestoft. But this is not the whole story. Following the coast from the Wash round to Essex, there were a number of different fishing operations, all set up to gain a living from the sea. In the late 18th and early 19th centuries, whaling operated from King's Lynn, and along the north west and north norfolk coasts there was a thriving shell fishery, for mussels, cockles and whelks. At Cromer, crab fishing and longshore fishing dominated. Inland, on the Broads, freshwater catches such as eels were exploited. In Essex, at Mersea, Burnham on Crouch and Brightlingsea, whitebait and oyster fishing were of more significance.

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Fishing

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Great Yarmouth Fishwharf

Preparing for the autumn herring season or ‘Home Fishing’ as it was known was the most important time in the basket makers year. During the months of October, November and December Great Yarmouth was the largest and busiest herring port in the world, packed with local and Scottish fishermen.An often-quoted figure is that 1000 drifter fleet worked out of the town of Great Yarmouth. This was largely made up of vessels from north of the border (742 out of 1006 in 1913, 973 out of 1179 in 1920) and it was their presence in the town, which largely accounted for the fishwharf being covered with the distinct Yarmouth fish container, the swill.

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Related Pages

Fishing

Theme: Fishing

Gansey knitting stick or shield

Knitting Stick

Gansey knitting stick or shield

Six steel double-pointed needles, of size 16 and 17 gauge, the type used for knitting ganseys.

Gansey Doube-pointed Steel Knitting Needles

Six steel double-pointed needles, of size 16 and 17 gauge, the type used for knitting ganseys.

Henry Valentine Little's Gansey

Henry Valentine Little's Gansey

Henry Valentine Little's Gansey

John Worthington:

Walter 'Primo' Allen wearing his gansey.

Walter 'Primo' Allen

Walter 'Primo' Allen wearing his gansey.

Portrait of Cromer fisherman Gilbert 'Leather' Rook wearing a gansey and chummy hat.

Cromer Fisherman Gilbert 'Leather' Rook, 1905.

Portrait of Cromer fisherman Gilbert 'Leather' Rook wearing a gansey and chummy hat.

The "Cromer" crew lookout

The "Cromer" crew lookout

The "Cromer" crew lookout

A photograph of 'Lotion Tar' Bishop, a fisherman in his gansey.

Photograph of 'Lotion Tar' Bishop, a fisherman in his gansey.

A photograph of 'Lotion Tar' Bishop, a fisherman in his gansey.

Turned wooden sheath with a large conical hole at one end

wooden sheath

Turned wooden sheath with a large conical hole at one end